July 18, 1938

( 6 documents, 4 translations )

Page 1
English
German

N.Y. July 18, 1938

Dear Puppiken, I am sitting on my bed in my pajamas, and still, sweat is running down my body. You are lucky not to have to endure this yet. I hardly dare move. And yet, people are saying that the worst is yet to come in August. Well, I am not looking forward to that. On Friday, Miss Tadakuma landed. I was not able to go to the ship because I had to work. She told me how you are doing, and I am glad to hear that you are well. She was very impressed with your good progress in English! Yesterday, I took her to visit with Leibholz where we spent Sunday afternoon. Of course, she is very lonely in the big city where she doesn’t know anyone. Unfortunately, I can’t take care of her because I am too busy with work.

Page 2
English
German

But only regarding time; otherwise, I don’t need to exert myself. I could go [to work] without my head on! I am enclosing a letter that Lise wrote to you. I did not contradict her in any way, because Germans who have been here for over a year already, don’t like to be contradicted, because they are real Americans now and know every detail of everything. I am not in favor of having items sent by [our/your?] parents later because I worry that we will have to pay import duties here. By the way, this has become stricter recently. But your possessions all have your name on them. That’s a good idea. Not too long ago, it would not have been so important. And I agree with Lise that we shouldn’t have too many warm things. Leave the down comforters there. I also don’t think we will need wool undergarments here. Go ahead and bring [our/some] flannel pajamas.

Page 3
English
German

If we have wool blankets for the winter, that is sufficient, because all places have steam heat. We have to make sure that we cut down on items that aren’t constantly used, because space is very rare and expensive. What you can’t fit in your suitcases, you should pack into a box, but don’t nail it shut, but rather have one made with a lock, like the one Franken had, who, by the way, hasn’t been in touch yet! I have since written to him. Leave your pillows as they are. Leibles have money. 1 dollar is not much for them. For us, it is a lot. That’s why what Lise writes about cheap prices is nonsense. Have you asked around regarding a fur coat? Quality winter coats are very expensive here. Buy a very good one for yourself, whether a fur or wool coat. Like Lise wrote, a quality wool coat with fur lining would be nice. I like those best. I think Mrs. Weill had one. But buy something you like!

Page 4
English
German

Write a few lines to Lise. She is counting on that because she is a Kowetschante*! I hope that you are well otherwise. How is your cooking coming along? I already wrote to you that you shouldn’t work too hard on all of those things. Today, I am thinking of your birthday and wondering if I will also do so at the right time? Well, you know me!! Why don’t you call Einschlags and send them my regards, tell them that I thank them for their last card and that I will write when the weather cools off! That reminds me that I forgot to thank [you?] for all of those nice things that J.(?) brought. I would like to do so now. Where is the good sausage from?

And I will close for now. Much love and kisses from your Fritz.

I am sure you are wondering why your affidavit hasn’t arrived yet. Everyone who is involved in has been delaying things. But I certainly hope to be able to mail it 2-3 days from now. Much love to everyone.

[Vertical text on left side]:

[Cannot make sense of first question.] I am enclosing a letter for Gartenberg because I assume that he has left by now. As soon as you find out his address [cut off]

*I am not familiar with this term and could not find it anywhere, but my guess is that it is related to the Yiddish word "kvetch", which is "quatschen" in German, so this could mean a "gossip".